Band-aid fixes are often applied to a hotel prior to selling to make the building more appealing. Catching these masked issues early on can prevent a catastrophic mold and moisture outbreak in your hotel.

 

CASE SUMMARY

Even though the mold growth was found behind the newly installed VWC the root cause could be traced back to a decision made just before the purchase of the hotel.

A mid-rise hotel in Tampa, Florida had recently undergone a sale. The new owner, who was changing flags, was updating the Furniture, Fixtures, and Equipment (FF&E) to meet the brand standards for the new flag. This 400+-room hotel, located in a commercial district of Tampa, was fairly basic in design, with a corporate feel. Though there were no major influential factors present that would elevate the probability of a mold and moisture problem (such as being located next to a large body of water), the hotel was unexpectedly impacted by a severe mold problem behind new vinyl wall covering (VWC) during the renovation process.

What makes this particular case study so interesting is the fact that the Property Condition Assessment (PCA) had not detected any mold in the building, nor had the construction team observed any mold as renovations began. The mold was only discovered after the new VWC had been installed. Ironically, even though the mold growth was new, the root cause of the problem could be traced back to a decision made just prior to the purchase.

Continue Reading DON’T LET A SIMPLE BAND-AID FIX CAUSE A MOLD OUTBREAK IN YOUR HOTEL

 

The Super Bowl was right around the corner, and much was at stake for this hotel. It was undergoing a room rehab with a hard deadline when an unforeseen mold and moisture problem brought work to a screeching halt..

 

Hotel renovation projects are often scheduled around upcoming events like large conventions or sporting events. For obvious reasons, these types of renovations typically have a hard deadline that cannot be missed. This puts a lot of stress on the construction and project management teams, who know that no matter what surprises may unfold during the rehab, the scheduled deadline must still be met. They must be able to overcome any obstacles while still keeping costs to a minimum.

 

CASE SUMMARY

This Midwestern project was a fast-track renovation of a 600-room hotel with a hard stop deadline of Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis. The renovation was intended to be a simple FF&E (Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment) project to upgrade the hotel’s appearance and give it a fresh feel for patrons coming to town for the Super Bowl.

During rehab of the first few rooms, the construction team pulled back the vinyl wall covering only to discover an unexpected mold issue on the vast majority of exterior walls. Panic and uncertainty immediately ensued as the project team tried to determine what needed to be done, how much it would cost, and whether the deadline would still be able to be met.

Continue Reading HOTEL RENOVATION FOR THE SUPER BOWL HALTED DUE TO MOLD OUTBREAK

 

When it comes to building performance, too much of a good thing can become a bad thing. Humidification to provide medical patient comfort is a good thing. Frost and ice damage due to that same humidification is not so good.

When new building code requirements require high performance and innovation incentives, such as those found in green building rating systems, significant confusion and some building failure will ensue. This is the current situation that designers and contractors are facing in wall system air barrier design and performance. Overly complex and problematic exterior wall systems due to a market-driven design emphasis on energy savings, high performance, and innovation inevitably lead to increased risk and liability in all climates, and concern about mold and moisture damage in hot/humid climates.

Significant in 2012 was the issuance of the International Green Construction Code (IgCC). This provided a vehicle for codifying many elements of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED)® rating systems and ASHRAE standards that have been issued over the last decade. (Most of them have been released in just the last two years.)

The development of codes such as the IgCC are often based on collaboration through cooperating industry professional society sponsors. Despite the benefits of collaboration, high performance and innovation initiatives are often driven by code empirical laboratory analysis, which sometimes does not translate well to field applications. This codification is then pushed out to contractors, who unfortunately must then face the task of interpreting sometimes puzzling requirements that don’t always make sense or work in the field.

Continue Reading AIR BARRIERS: EXPECTATIONS VS. REALITY
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