Most prospective owners involved in the process of acquiring a hotel property understand that some renovations may be necessary, but aren’t prepared for hidden moisture and mold damage that will exponentially escalate repair costs. Unfortunately, this kind of oversight happens repeatedly during hotel transactions because the due process that is followed doesn’t include the

After over 25 years of figuring out why buildings end up as catastrophic mold and moisture building failures – there are some apparent truths that have remained seemingly unchanged.

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Buildings should not be designed in silos (but they still are). Despite advances in technical understanding and higher standards for building performance, like building envelope airtightness, the design task for the building envelope is still being completed in a vacuum of other critical disciplines. On a recent project, the facade consultant was asked how their design interfaced with the overall building pressurization requirements established by the HVAC design. The answer: “We don’t consider that in our design. They do their thing and we do ours.”


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Do You Know the Vital Signs for Avoiding Moisture & Mold Problems?

Will Your Brand Standards Cause You Headaches?

How Will You Recover Costs If You Do Get Into Trouble?

Sign up for our free July 10 webinar on “Hotel Renovations: More Than Just Minding the Dust”.

The time has come to perform that next renovation cycle for your hotel. You have successfully lined up your team of property staff, designers, and contractors. You are pleased with the fresh look proposed by the designers. Work is scheduled around your occupancy rate and the first wave of workers is let loose. You are ready for success – until the unexpected happens. Hidden moisture and mold damage disrupts your schedule, delays your reopening, requires redesign work, and increases the construction budget with a multitude of change orders.

If you had seen this coming, your entire renovation strategy would have been altered from the beginning. But could you have seen it coming? Most likely….if you had checked the essential building vital signs. A hotel owner/operator should assess these markers as the first step in any renovation to determine the potential for hidden moisture and mold damage. Understanding those vital signs, as well as the possible negative impact of brand standards, is critical for success.


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Avoid Catastrophic Mold and Moisture Problems in Hot, Humid Climates Due to Air Barrier Standard Confusion

By George DuBose, CGC; Richard Scott, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP; and Donald B. Snell, PC CIEC

Imagine the following scenario: you just designed your newest project to meet the most current whole building air leakage standards, and your mechanical engineer subconsultant has designed an HVAC system that includes one of the latest energy recovery strategies. Both factors are intended to meet high energy efficiency goals, making you proud that your firm is doing its part (amongst other things) to minimize your impact on the climate change problem.


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As the building and construction industry continues to come out of the hibernation that has been the norm since 2009, it unfortunately appears that it’s déjà vu all over again when it comes to water-related building failures. As new buildings are being constructed, the same design and construction deficiencies of the past are being repeated, leading to (often catastrophic) mold and moisture problems.

It may seem somewhat unbelievable that the industry still finds itself making these same basic mistakes time after time. After all, preventative solutions to these issues have been understood and well-published for many years.


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The emergence of #modular construction as an option for new construction is becoming mainstream. The reasons have been reported on well. However, what has not been reported is that the modular construction industry has had mold and moisture problems, especially, when used in a warm and humid climate like the Southeast US. Both wood frame and steel frame modular construction have experienced problems with crawl space, marriage wall, and ceiling to floor cavity, condensation problems that have not only resulted in deterioration of the wood, corrosion of metal floor pans, deteriorate wallboard and mold.

The greatest risk of modular construction failures has been seen to be when this type of construction and delivery is used for hotels, student housing, senior living, soldier housing, type facilities. In general, facilities that are domicidal or multi family in nature. This is because these types of facilities have inherent similarities in a living unit that requires both an individual cooling/heating unit, bathroom exhaust, and some sort of central HVAC make up air system. In addition, there are many more modular “boxes” in these kinds of buildings increasing the number of marriage wall interior cavities and ceiling to floor cavities that otherwise might not be required in other types of modular construction. The nature of modular construction makes it difficult to repair once it is found to be damaged. Sometimes, the damage can be such that the modular building has to be deconstructed to remove damaged materials and then re-designed and re-constructed using conventional methods. This essentially makes the modular construction advantages dissolve away as the building gets converted to a traditional “stick” building.


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Just months after completing refurbishment on a 300+ room resort, the owner of a luxury coastal vacation resort began to wonder if he had entered into the Twilight Zone when mold and moisture problems suddenly emerged in numerous guestrooms. He was perplexed that this problem was cropping up now despite the fact that he had owned and operated similar properties for many years. Never in all that time had he ever experienced moisture-related issues.

Why was the problem occurring at this point? What was different?


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What Did You Miss? What Did Building Owners, Developers, and Contractors Miss?

Richard Scott, AIA – Vice-president, Senior Forensic Architect

Over 15,000 architects attended the recent AIA 2017 National Conference on Architecture (A’17) in Orlando, Florida. What did they learn that you missed?  As a speaker and attendee, the following are the top three things I learned at this invigorating Conference:

1. Building forensic sessions were well attended, and still scare architects. And building forensics should still be scaring owners, developers, and contractors. There were over a dozen sessions on building envelope technology, disaster avoidance, and commissioning, some presented by forensic experts. Even the 7 AM forensic sessions, such as my Liberty Building Forensics Group (LBFG) presentation on air barriers, had over 100 attendees even though it was concurrent with 19 other sessions. No one likes a building failure unless of course, it is someone else’s failure.  So advice on prevention, based on failure case studies, drew many interested parties, questions, and concerns. Those who did not attend may want to at least obtain the handouts from forensic sessions.

LBFG’s session not only presented the complexity and difficulty of specifying and constructing air barriers but also the checkered and uncoordinated landscape of code and industry standard requirements (the session handout is available on the AIA A’17 app as well as LBFG’s website, www.buildingforensicsgroup.com). LBFG’s business is investigating and litigating building envelope and HVAC failures. The combination of failed envelope air barriers and failed HVAC leads to exponential damages to building facades, structures, finishes, and contents.


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After over 25 years of figuring out why buildings end up as catastrophic mold and moisture building failures – there are some apparent truths that have remained seemingly unchanged.

Buildings should not be designed in silos (but they still are). Despite advances in technical understanding and higher standards for building performance, like building envelope airtightness, the design task for the building envelope is still being completed in a vacuum of other critical disciplines. On a recent project, the facade consultant was asked how their design interfaced with the overall building pressurization requirements established by the HVAC design. The answer: “We don’t consider that in our design. They do their thing and we do ours.”


Continue Reading