Band-aid fixes are often applied to a hotel prior to selling to make the building more appealing. Catching these masked issues early on can prevent a catastrophic mold and moisture outbreak in your hotel.

 

CASE SUMMARY

Even though the mold growth was found behind the newly installed VWC the root cause could be traced back to a decision made just before the purchase of the hotel.

A mid-rise hotel in Tampa, Florida had recently undergone a sale. The new owner, who was changing flags, was updating the Furniture, Fixtures, and Equipment (FF&E) to meet the brand standards for the new flag. This 400+-room hotel, located in a commercial district of Tampa, was fairly basic in design, with a corporate feel. Though there were no major influential factors present that would elevate the probability of a mold and moisture problem (such as being located next to a large body of water), the hotel was unexpectedly impacted by a severe mold problem behind new vinyl wall covering (VWC) during the renovation process.

What makes this particular case study so interesting is the fact that the Property Condition Assessment (PCA) had not detected any mold in the building, nor had the construction team observed any mold as renovations began. The mold was only discovered after the new VWC had been installed. Ironically, even though the mold growth was new, the root cause of the problem could be traced back to a decision made just prior to the purchase.

Continue Reading DON’T LET A SIMPLE BAND-AID FIX CAUSE A MOLD OUTBREAK IN YOUR HOTEL

 

INTRODUCTION

An alarming number of new buildings suffer from moisture and mold problems. The risk of failure is highest in—but not limited to—cold, temperate, warm-humid, and hot-humid climates. The debate on why some buildings fail and others do not, as well as who is responsible for these failures and how to fix them, rages on. Instead of being aired in architecture schools and at engineering society meetings, however, this debate goes on in courtrooms and mediation hearings, among highly paid expert witnesses and lawyers—not among people who should be preventing failures, but among those who are rewarded by their occurrence.

The building industry seems baffled about the prevalence of building failures. Many wonder why the rate of building failures is not declining despite better technology, increased training, and more sophisticated building systems. It is not due to indifference or ignorance. We know we can prevent buildings from failing because we can fix them once they do fail. The primary reason we are not coming to grips with this far-reaching problem is simple: the design professionals entrusted with building performance are not receiving adequate feedback on the performance of their previous buildings.

Without that feedback, we do not know why some buildings work well and others do not, despite being apparently designed the same way. Metrics may say that the industry did a good job, yet clients keep complaining about building failure and the construction litigation business keeps growing. Until architects and engineers receive better performance feedback, they will have neither the ability nor the incentive to change.

 

Continue Reading Why Buildings Fail

Over the past few months, there have been tens of thousands of Google searches for PTAC units, using keyword phrases as simple as “what are PTAC units” and “consequences of using PTAC units.” While numerous results turn up for these kinds of searches, not many are backed by 30+ years of building forensics experience in the field.

 

At Liberty Building Forensics Group (LBFG), our building experts have 30+ years of experience in building forensics and have solved, fixed, prevented, and recovered some of the world’s most complex building mold and moisture problems. They have investigated hundreds of hotel moisture problems involving over 100,000 guest rooms, and are dedicated to the individual, operator, builder, and owner in providing a safe and mold-free environment for all.

Continue Reading Synopsis of 30+ Years Working With PTAC Units