Projects Completed by Liberty

The emergence of #modular construction as an option for new construction is becoming mainstream. The reasons have been reported on well. However, what has not been reported is that the modular construction industry has had mold and moisture problems, especially, when used in a warm and humid climate like the Southeast US. Both wood frame and steel frame modular construction have experienced problems with crawl space, marriage wall, and ceiling to floor cavity, condensation problems that have not only resulted in deterioration of the wood, corrosion of metal floor pans, deteriorate wallboard and mold.

The greatest risk of modular construction failures has been seen to be when this type of construction and delivery is used for hotels, student housing, senior living, soldier housing, type facilities. In general, facilities that are domicidal or multi family in nature. This is because these types of facilities have inherent similarities in a living unit that requires both an individual cooling/heating unit, bathroom exhaust, and some sort of central HVAC make up air system. In addition, there are many more modular “boxes” in these kinds of buildings increasing the number of marriage wall interior cavities and ceiling to floor cavities that otherwise might not be required in other types of modular construction. The nature of modular construction makes it difficult to repair once it is found to be damaged. Sometimes, the damage can be such that the modular building has to be deconstructed to remove damaged materials and then re-designed and re-constructed using conventional methods. This essentially makes the modular construction advantages dissolve away as the building gets converted to a traditional “stick” building.


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Just months after completing refurbishment on a 300+ room resort, the owner of a luxury coastal vacation resort began to wonder if he had entered into the Twilight Zone when mold and moisture problems suddenly emerged in numerous guestrooms. He was perplexed that this problem was cropping up now despite the fact that he had owned and operated similar properties for many years. Never in all that time had he ever experienced moisture-related issues.

Why was the problem occurring at this point? What was different?


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What Did You Miss? What Did Building Owners, Developers, and Contractors Miss?

Richard Scott, AIA – Vice-president, Senior Forensic Architect

Over 15,000 architects attended the recent AIA 2017 National Conference on Architecture (A’17) in Orlando, Florida. What did they learn that you missed?  As a speaker and attendee, the following are the top three things I learned at this invigorating Conference:

1. Building forensic sessions were well attended, and still scare architects. And building forensics should still be scaring owners, developers, and contractors. There were over a dozen sessions on building envelope technology, disaster avoidance, and commissioning, some presented by forensic experts. Even the 7 AM forensic sessions, such as my Liberty Building Forensics Group (LBFG) presentation on air barriers, had over 100 attendees even though it was concurrent with 19 other sessions. No one likes a building failure unless of course, it is someone else’s failure.  So advice on prevention, based on failure case studies, drew many interested parties, questions, and concerns. Those who did not attend may want to at least obtain the handouts from forensic sessions.

LBFG’s session not only presented the complexity and difficulty of specifying and constructing air barriers but also the checkered and uncoordinated landscape of code and industry standard requirements (the session handout is available on the AIA A’17 app as well as LBFG’s website, www.buildingforensicsgroup.com). LBFG’s business is investigating and litigating building envelope and HVAC failures. The combination of failed envelope air barriers and failed HVAC leads to exponential damages to building facades, structures, finishes, and contents.


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In our work as forensic architects and engineers, we are regularly involved in litigation over stucco failures, including hotels and high-rise condo complexes. (For this article, ‘stucco’ refers to traditional portland cement plaster direct-applied to a masonry substrate, rather than using lath.)

Myths abound around stucco cracking. In truth, it is not abnormal to have some cracking with stucco, much of which can be relatively harmless. The key is paying attention to the types of cracks, and minimizing any significant issues that might lead to actual failure, including debonding, water intrusion, and mold problems. It is not a good idea to pack out stucco so thick it may end up debonding and falling on those Bentleys (and their owners) below.

Myth #3: Direct-applied stucco is easily packed out to meet a finished plane.


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In our work as forensic architects and engineers, we are regularly involved in litigation over stucco failures, including hotels and high-rise condo complexes. (For this article, ‘stucco’ refers to traditional portland cement plaster direct-applied to a masonry substrate, rather than using lath.)

Myths abound around stucco cracking. In truth, it is not abnormal to have some cracking with stucco, much of which can be relatively harmless. The key is paying attention to the types of cracks, and minimizing any significant issues that might lead to actual failure, including debonding, water intrusion, and mold problems.

Myth #2: Control joints are required every 13.5 m2 (144 sf).


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In our work as forensic architects and engineers, we are regularly involved in litigation over stucco failures, including hotels and high-rise condo complexes. (For this article, ‘stucco’ refers to traditional portland cement plaster direct-applied to a masonry substrate, rather than using lath.)

Myths abound around stucco cracking. In truth, it is not abnormal to have some cracking with stucco, much of which can be relatively harmless. The key is paying attention to the types of cracks, and minimizing any significant issues that might lead to actual failure, including debonding, water intrusion, and mold problems.

Myth #1: Stucco on lath over CMU/concrete is superior to direct-applied
 


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